// Why training all the time prevents fat loss //
 
The funny thing is, people (including myself) generally don’t mind training all the time if it means actually seeing better results.
 
We all naturally want the biggest bang for our buck. The thing is, with fat loss, the process can be very misleading.
 
Starting out, training 5-7 times per week (on face value) yields really, really good results. The results are tangible and the scale clearly downshifts anywhere from 4 – 10 lbs over a short period.
 
It’s here the problems set in.
 
> The scale stops moving
> We get annoyed
> We hike up training volume
> Still nothing
> Motivation dips
 
And this is where it really starts go south…
 
> We google ‘why can’t I lose weight?’
> We read biased articles on ‘correct’ nutrition which slate VITAL nutrients.
> We start to become opinionated on different dieting strategies which all, ultimately, do the exactly same thing.
> We start to fall into ‘cults’, such as, condemning carbs to hell and cutting them out of the diet.
> Labelling certain food as ‘good’ and certain food as ‘bad’.
 
The issues cascade from here.
 
Usually at this point losing more weight only seems to happen when we try a ‘new method’ or whenever the stars miraculously align.
 
I get it – this used to be me.
 
But look, it doesn’t have to be this difficult, it really doesn’t.
 
If you’re at all familiar with my content, you’ll know that understanding the body as an ENERGY SYSTEM is the most important factor for weight loss.
 
> The accumulative effect, over time (days) of eating less, on par, or more than the body burns will promote the body to move downwards, maintain or up in weight.
 
Which makes total sense.
 
===================================================
 
So, going back to the original question – does training all the time prevent more weight from shifting?
 
No, it doesn’t. The battle you’re ACTUALLY having is with over feeding as a DIRECT result of training too much.
 
Breaking it down >
 
You’ll be really, really struggling to keep food intake low enough to continue with weight loss. You’ll be suffering from cravings, headaches, nausea, fatigue, mental fog, lack of motivation etc.
 
> It’s all a bi-product of underfeeding the body proportionate to the workload <
 
Strenuous training 5-7 times per week is for ATHLETES who eat a lot of food to support the training and to promote significant endurance and /or strength gains…. or for people that just enjoy training that much and have their goals and nutritional intake dialled in to support the workload.
 
You do not have to do this!
 
So get off the treadmill, and get out of the gym.
 
Sustainable fat loss – you’ll be glad to hear involves the opposite.
 
> Cut back the training, and eat marginally less than the body burns <
 
For shifting body weight, especially if there’s quite a bit to lose, this will yield the result you’re after.
 
So, how do you know how much the body burns, I’ve covered this before – but there’s two roads you can go down:
 
> Get a log, track body weight first thing in the morning and track food intake for one week. Look at the trend body weight follows throughout the week – staying the same? Going down? Going up? Adjust food intake accordingly.
 
Or..
 
> Use pretty accurate ready-made formulas. I’ve used these loads (not only on myself, but on others too) – they are great starting points and remove stress from the equation.
 
Energy balancing properly will flat out, eliminate all the issues you’re having with shifting body fat. That I guarantee – you’ve just got to find that balance.
 
Does the system need refining the leaner you are? Yes, absolutely – but get to grips with this first and understand that training all the time and chronically under feeding is causing your struggle.
 
If this requires too much effort and you’d rather just carry on winging it – then don’t complain when you never each your dream body composition.
 
Now’s the time to stop winging it – and get to grips with what the people at the TOP of their game are doing to reach your dream body with less time invested, and less effort.

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